Singham Returns – A Review

 Rohit Shetty directs Ajay Devgn and Kareena Kapoor Khan in Singham Returns would be an overstatement as he doesn’t do much directing but instead decides which corny dialogue to be delivered in the worst possible way by which of his comically stereotyped characters along with which of India’s social woes as the background.

Not having seen the 2011 blockbuster Singham, but having heard rave reviews about the same and also having been recently enjoyed the guilt trip that was Kick I decided to give this one a try. Very few movies have the ability to make me feel physically sick and Singham Returns manages to do just that. The only actor not hamming it is Anupam Kher who decides very early on that this is too messy even for him to be a part of and decides to off himself.

Amol Gupte who is quickly losing all credibility as an actor (and a director) plays a nirmal-baba like character who needs a few laxatives thrown in with his mugs of beer because he seems severely constipated while trying to deliver lines that give Anu Malik’s shayaris a run for its money in terms of how badly constructed they are. Zakir Hussain as Prakash Rao is ridiculously caricatured politician who verbalizes every thought that crosses the peas in his head that he calls brain. Ashwini Kalsekar as the Barkha Dutt wannabe journo with a penchant for being as loud and intolerable as Arnab Goswami has more of a role to play in the movie than Kareena Kapoor Khan but is in equal parts annoying. Speaking of Kareena Kapoor Khan the superstar who can only be afforded by masala blockbusters; she has played the same annoying character in numerous other outings and the results are entirely banal. KKK (if your brain grey matter is the racial minority then Kareena Kapoor Khan is the violent assault on it) has lost the size zero look, the pout and all semblance of being a perfect bimbo which is what got her so far – she literally has nothing going for her here – might as well retire to the Pataudi Palace.

Ajay Devgn shows signs of being a tolerable actor when he looks all grim and speaks minimally but then loses all his marbles the minute he has to do his signature “aata maazi satakli” and other moves. He is ridiculous. Mahesh Manjarekar does the impossible – in this ham-fest he rises above and refuses to ham and comes off looking as the better actor amongst all. The only redemption to be found is towards the end where Dayanand Shetty AKA Daya-the-darwaza-todoing-expert is asked to break the doors down – I’ll admit I clapped.

Daya Breaking Doors in Singham Returns 3

Rohit Shetty tries to make a bullet point presentation of all of India’s woes and all of the current affairs news blimps :

  • Corruption in the political system
  • Communal tensions
  • Black Money
  • Introduction of fresh blood in politics inspired by a saintly figure hell-bent on fixing points 1 & 3
  • Judicial impotence
  • Media overreach

The one news item he misses out on is that of sexual assault – but he achieves that by assaulting the audiences’ intelligence in the most horrific of ways.

I cannot emphasize strongly enough that there is absolutely no reason why you should want to go watch this movie. There is nothing to be gained by subjecting yourselves to such an unevolved attempt at movie making. If you need alternative ways to kill time consider these : watch kick instead, watch CID on TV Daya breaks more doors there, Knit – winter’s coming or at least it feels so here.

Advertisements

Satyagraha – A Review

Prakash Jha directs Amitabh Bachchan, Ajay Devgan and Kareena Kapoor in the socio-political drama Satyagraha in an attempt to recreate the period of turmoil and pseudo revolution the country went through with the Anna Hazare movement for Jan Lokpal bill.

Considering the state of politics in the country Jha couldn’t have chosen a more apt topic for storytelling and the cast that is so on-the- nose with the figures that featured in the actual movement. Amitabh Bachchan is Anna Hazare, Ajay Devgan is Arvind Kejriwal, Kareena Kapoor is Sazia Ilmi, the police officer is presumably Kiran Bedi and the lawyer is Prashant Bhushan.

The story starts of jerkily with a grumpy old map Dwarka Anand played by Amitabh berates Manav played by Devgan for his capitalist ideology and blames him and other of his ilk for the rampant corruption that is crippling the society. While not untrue the preachy monologue feels overbearing and when you are playing to crowd of 500 who have paid an exorbitant amount of money to go see the movie it is self-defeating when you go on a diatribe about consumerism and capitalism.

The story has good intentions but it does not fill out the plot between the bullet points which form the skeleton of the story and the dialogues are so stilted and clichéd that it is hard to sit through. The first half of the movie had me throwing up my hands in exasperation so many times that it is a surprise I was able to sit for the second half at all.  The second half gets better with the actors being given a much tighter script and a more thought out screenplay.  But the reliance of the story on the actual Anna movement is so obvious that any deviation from the original sticks out like a sore thumb. The point where Arjun Rampal picks up arms makes absolutely no sense whatsoever as does the Janta Rocks song.

Amongst actors Arjun Rampal is not terrible and that is about as high a praise as he is ever going to get from me. Amrita Rao is pretty and does the simpering widow role justice but she seriously needs to work on her voice modulation because he voice grates on your nerves after a while. Manoj Bajpai is the biggest disappointment as he brings nothing new or novel to his corrupt politician role as this is the same role which he has played in almost all of Jha’s movies off late. Ajay Devgan is alright but nothing to write home about gone is the latent intensity of Gangajal. Kareena Surprises as she is at the same time very beautiful to look at and does hold her own between Devgan and Bachchan. And what can be said about Amitabh Bachchan that has not already been said – he is a genius when it comes to acting, he looks fantastic for his age here and he carries the entire weight of the movie on his very able shoulders and that baritone of his. This is one of the best Amitabh Bachchan performances of late and I wish there exists a film maker who can write a story without the need for a massive ensemble and just give me 2 hours of Amitabh Bachchan acting out a brilliantly written role. All I can say is Give it up for Bachchan and give up everything else!

My biggest problem is with the choices Jha makes, for a film maker of his reputation it is unforgivable the amateurish way the movie is made, some of the scenes feel more like story blocking scenes where in the actors are reading the scenes and not necessarily acting them out, the reliance on clichés and word for word reference to the Jan Lokpal movement.  While trying to keep it as close to the real movement Jha comes off as lazy and relying on evoking the memories by using the same phrases (the law is made by elected officials not by people on the street, dictatorial attitude and many more). The use of rock band and rock music to make it more youth-centric seems misplaced. One thing to Jha’s credit is the way he shows how the social media can be manipulated and what an important role it plays in keeping such a revolution alive.

Of the songs , “Raske Bhare Tore Naina” fails to evoke the “Mora Piya” from Rajneeti, Janta Rocks and Hum Bole The are just plain bad. Raghupati Raghav Raja Ram is actually quite well written by Prasoon Joshi.

I really wouldn’t recommend this movie outside of the brilliant turn by Amitabh and perhaps if you want to relive the Jan Lokpal movement. In terms of original content Jha fails miserably. Good intentions do not necessarily a good movie make.