Mirzya – A Review

Image result for mirzya posterRakeysh Omprakash Mehra directs debutantes Harshvardhan Kapoor and Saiyami Kher in Mirzya. Mirzya is the story of the famed folk tale of Mirza Sahiba the star crossed lovers who meet a tragic end.

 

Monish and Suchitra are childhood friends who go to school together. When Suchitra covers for Monish when he hasn’t done his homework she is punished. Monish enraged by such cruel treatment of her beloved takes drastic action and is sent to the correction home for young criminals. Suchitra moves away distraught. Years later Suchitra is engaged to the prince of Jaisalmer Rajasthan and Monish having escaped the remand home and changed his name works as the horse groomer for the prince fully aware of Suchitra. What follows from here on is the tale on the lines of the Mirza-Sahiba.

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Rakeysh Mehra used the dual timeline to tell the story in the landmark Rang De Basanti tries it once again with Mirzya. There is Mirzya the warrior who bids for the princess’s hand and then elopes with her on her wedding night only to be pursued by the princess’ clan and her fiancé and there is Monish and Suchitra the modern day Mirzya and Sahiba. Where Mehra succeeded in Rang De Basanti was the relentless pacing of the movie that kept the audience engrossed and the two timelines never repeated what was happening by merely changing the props. With Mirzya the story is literally scene for scene retelling of the same snippets of the stories in the two timelines. It isn’t entirely unpleasant simply because of the jaw dropping scenery involved. The ancient tale is set on the virgin landscapes of Leh and Ladakh and the contemporary is set amidst the golden sands of Rajasthan, arguably two of the most beautiful places not only in India but the world over.

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Polish cinematographer Pawel Dyllus frames each scene as if a couplet of poetry. Every tragic scene is captured so beautifully that all you can do is sigh contentedly. The music by Shankar Ehsaan Loy coupled with the Gulzar’s heartrending  lyrics is the absolute stand out of the movie, a little restraint perhaps would have proved to be more effective the “nadiyaa” song seems a throw away but the Hichchaki and the title track are goose-bump inducing. The frenzied dancing of the blacksmith is the meeting of the two flowers of yesteryear and I for once commend the director for making that visual choice instead of the writhing bodies of the hero and heroine. The imagery on the walls of the village is also a nice touch.

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Harshvardhan Kapoor seems to have inherited his father’s ruffian charm. As a debutante he is composed and charming and entirely believable as the Rajasthani horse groomer. I cannot wait to see what he does next. Saiyami Kher is a stunning beauty with flyaway curls a plenty and bambi like eyes that hold your attention. She however lacks the gravitas to pull off the role of the tragic heroine Sahiba and her performance seems a little superfluous. In the final scenes though she does full justice to Sabyasachi wedding lehenga running across the unending dessert as if from the pages of some editorial. A few diction lessons and practising a resting face will do her good in the long run. Anjali Patil as Zeenat in a minuscule role leaves a lasting impression and Anuj Pandey as Prince Karan is mostly believable.

Mirzya, mirza sahiban, mirza sahiban original story, mirza sahiban story, Harshvardhan Kapoor, Saiyami Kher

Go for the visuals, stay for the soulful lyrics and leave with the spine tingling music still buzzing in your head. Every frame is a moving painting, every word a story of heartbreak in itself and every note a life affirming experience. Go watch Mirzya!

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PK – A Review (contains spoilers)

Rajkumar Hirani directs Aamir Khan and Anushka Sharma in P.K. a curious tale of an alien who lands on earth from a planet far far away to do research on the human inhabitants just as we endeavor to send missions to mars and take on interstellar travels to figure out who if anyone is out there. P.K. does not have such high sci-fi ambitions. In true Rajkumar Hirani fashion all that this movie aspires to do is to shine a mirror on the woes that have befallen the Indian society like the questionable ethics of the medical education and practice in Munnabhai MBBS and the land mafia in Lage Raho Munnabhai. With P.K. Hirani mounts an assault on the god men of India.  Not entirely original but wholly enjoyable.

The story focuses on Aamir Khan and his encounter with a TV journalist Jaggu played by Anushka Sharma. Tired of doing absurd stories on suicidal dogs Jaggu is intrigued by Aamir who is distributing pamphlets on the Delhi metro.  Trusting her journalistic instincts she chases the story to understand who this strange man is and what his motivations are.  While in a jail cell PK narrates his story to Jaggu who takes him to be mentally unstable, until he proves himself by reading her thoughts. Jaggu believes PK when he says that something of great importance is with a famous god-man Tapasviji, played by Saurabh Shukla in a surprisingly restrained role for what is essentially a caricature on the infamous Nirmal baba. This same Tapasviji was the reason for the rift between Jaggu and her father and also the reason for the attack on her news channel’s head when he questioned his tactics. She and her boss (played by Boman Irani) use PK as bait to goad Tapasviji to try and expose him.

Aamir Khan the self-proclaimed perfectionist of Bollywood created quite a stir with his naked appearance on the posters of the movie with his modesty barely protected by an ancient looking transistor radio. Thankfully that there isn’t much reliance on shock value in the movie outside of the opening sequence which is shot with a sense of humor not usually associated with Bollywood movies. It is almost a Kyle XY moment and done tastefully.  I’ve long suspected Aamir’s acting to be the emperor’s new clothes and here too he does nothing special. He isn’t as particularly bad as he was with Dhoom 3 with his pained expressions but his protruding eyes and a permanently arched eyebrow here beg explanation. His strange Bhojpuri accent and an even stranger sartorial sense are justified while he narrates his story to Jaggu but nothing is said about his eyes and they are a distraction. Anushka Sharma carries forward her brash news anchor shtick from Jab Tak hai Jaan but is less annoying given that Aamir does most of the heavy lifting here.  This movie relies far less on its lead actors and their individual talents and is carried above mediocrity by its witty writing and an easily identifiable screenplay by Hirani and Ajitab Joshi.

For a movie that is trying to tackle such a huge problem as organized religion it relies too heavily on gaffes and clichés. While in Delhi looking for the lost belongings Aamir seems to take on a pilgrimage to every corner of India over the course of one song and it makes no sense.  The frequent cuts to songs also are a little disingenuous and break the flow of the story. The supporting cast is poorly chosen and underwritten with the exception of Sanjay Dutt who in a brief appearance as Bhairon Singh is brilliant. The movie walks a fine line on the safe side of becoming too preachy when espousing the same popular arguments of “why waste milk on stone idols when hundreds are hungry” and “if god has a master plan then why buy a book of mantras for Rs.10 to have a male child instead of a female child” and adds a new Malala-inspired “Itna chota nahin ho sakta hamara khuda, ki use hamare school jaane pe aitraaz ho”. My biggest gripe with the movie was the heavy reliance on the voice-over, it is lazy, uninspiring and worse of all patronizing by assuming your audience needs directions to follow the story. Where it succeeds unanimously is the juxtaposing of rituals of the Hindu, Christian and Muslim religion both in terms of the prayer offering and the choice of colors the women wear to indicate their marital status.

This is a perfectly enjoyable movie with inoffensive acting by its lead pair. An entirely satisfying climax which I saw coming from the time Anushka was waiting in the marriage registrar’s office – but it has the potential to surprise people nevertheless. This movie does not take a real stand against the god-men and their ilk like OMG did but it gets the message across. However what I fear is that it might get lost in the humor that this movie wishes to peddle at a higher premium. Stay away from hyperboles this is neither Hirani’s or Aamir’s best work till date nor is it the best movie of 2014 – take it for what it is and enjoy the movie.