Mirzya – A Review

Image result for mirzya posterRakeysh Omprakash Mehra directs debutantes Harshvardhan Kapoor and Saiyami Kher in Mirzya. Mirzya is the story of the famed folk tale of Mirza Sahiba the star crossed lovers who meet a tragic end.

 

Monish and Suchitra are childhood friends who go to school together. When Suchitra covers for Monish when he hasn’t done his homework she is punished. Monish enraged by such cruel treatment of her beloved takes drastic action and is sent to the correction home for young criminals. Suchitra moves away distraught. Years later Suchitra is engaged to the prince of Jaisalmer Rajasthan and Monish having escaped the remand home and changed his name works as the horse groomer for the prince fully aware of Suchitra. What follows from here on is the tale on the lines of the Mirza-Sahiba.

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Rakeysh Mehra used the dual timeline to tell the story in the landmark Rang De Basanti tries it once again with Mirzya. There is Mirzya the warrior who bids for the princess’s hand and then elopes with her on her wedding night only to be pursued by the princess’ clan and her fiancé and there is Monish and Suchitra the modern day Mirzya and Sahiba. Where Mehra succeeded in Rang De Basanti was the relentless pacing of the movie that kept the audience engrossed and the two timelines never repeated what was happening by merely changing the props. With Mirzya the story is literally scene for scene retelling of the same snippets of the stories in the two timelines. It isn’t entirely unpleasant simply because of the jaw dropping scenery involved. The ancient tale is set on the virgin landscapes of Leh and Ladakh and the contemporary is set amidst the golden sands of Rajasthan, arguably two of the most beautiful places not only in India but the world over.

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Polish cinematographer Pawel Dyllus frames each scene as if a couplet of poetry. Every tragic scene is captured so beautifully that all you can do is sigh contentedly. The music by Shankar Ehsaan Loy coupled with the Gulzar’s heartrending  lyrics is the absolute stand out of the movie, a little restraint perhaps would have proved to be more effective the “nadiyaa” song seems a throw away but the Hichchaki and the title track are goose-bump inducing. The frenzied dancing of the blacksmith is the meeting of the two flowers of yesteryear and I for once commend the director for making that visual choice instead of the writhing bodies of the hero and heroine. The imagery on the walls of the village is also a nice touch.

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Harshvardhan Kapoor seems to have inherited his father’s ruffian charm. As a debutante he is composed and charming and entirely believable as the Rajasthani horse groomer. I cannot wait to see what he does next. Saiyami Kher is a stunning beauty with flyaway curls a plenty and bambi like eyes that hold your attention. She however lacks the gravitas to pull off the role of the tragic heroine Sahiba and her performance seems a little superfluous. In the final scenes though she does full justice to Sabyasachi wedding lehenga running across the unending dessert as if from the pages of some editorial. A few diction lessons and practising a resting face will do her good in the long run. Anjali Patil as Zeenat in a minuscule role leaves a lasting impression and Anuj Pandey as Prince Karan is mostly believable.

Mirzya, mirza sahiban, mirza sahiban original story, mirza sahiban story, Harshvardhan Kapoor, Saiyami Kher

Go for the visuals, stay for the soulful lyrics and leave with the spine tingling music still buzzing in your head. Every frame is a moving painting, every word a story of heartbreak in itself and every note a life affirming experience. Go watch Mirzya!

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RamLeela – A Review

Sanjay Leela Bhansali directs Ranveer Singh and Deepika Padukone in the “goliyon ki Rasleela – Ram Leela” an adaptation of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. And after the directorial misstep that was Guzarish and the producing abomination that was Rowdy Rathore Bhansali retreads the familiar paths he etched with “Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam” and “Devdas” and the result is a richly layered and textured visual masterpiece that manages to strike a balance in catering to the masses and appealing to the classes as well.

Ram as played by a mustard-oil drenched Ranveer Singh and Leela as played by the statuesque Deepika Padukone play the Romeo and Juliet belonging to the opposing clans of a village in Gujarat whose rivalry goes back 500 years. The ill-fated lovers lay eyes upon each other on holi-day and what unfolds is a tragic romance that has found innumerable adaptations and countless influences when it comes to love stories.

The story by Siddharth and Garima and also the screenplay steers clear of the clichéd and predictable tropes for most parts and manages to even surprise once or twice with you holding your breath as what unravels was so far away from the expected that the result is spectacular. I wish they had worked on giving the opening sequence a bit more dynamism than a person relaying the backstory and context to someone else via a telephone call. Also the second half really needed to be cut short to drive home the impact even more effectively but these are minor grievances.

Bhansali and Ravi Varman capture stunning visuals that are nobody’s business. There is no better visual auteur in India today who understands how to frame a beautiful shot than Sanjay Leela Bhansali. Every shot is a painting that can be hung up on a wall. Every scene is visual poetry. The dance sequences are framed and shot with such throbbing vibrancy that you cannot help but take a sharp intake of breath as the set pieces unveil and the scenery is laid bare before you to soak in.  No one does water reflection shots like Bhansali does – from the glittering havelis of the tavayafs of chitpur from devdas to that one tracking shot in Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam from the song “Dholi Taro” and here to Udaipur become Jantara and the lights of the city palace reflect like precious jewels in Lake Pichola. STUNNING! Another spectacular shot is that of Kesar running away from her pursuers and the rolling of the pot along with her – like I said visual poetry.

All this visual artistry would be wasted if it wasn’t for the solid acting chops on display. Ranveer who always makes me cringe with his off-screen presence (interviews et al) still manages to strike a balance between playing a playboy and transforming to the titular Ram (yes of the mythic Ramayana). Deepika just takes your breath away every time she is on screen with her beauty but she has grown in the acting department and how! This is perhaps the best she has ever been and she manages to carry most of the movie on her shoulder while Ranveer is focusing more on thrusting his pelvis every chance he gets.  Richa Chaddha and Barkha Bhisht who play the daughters- in – law of the Saneda and Rajadi clans respectively are brilliant in their respective roles. Supriya Pathak Kapur who plays Dhankor the clan-mother of the Saneda clan is power personified. She plays the lioness like Dhankor with such aplomb that I was going into giddy fits every time she appeared on screen. I would pay top dollar to watch Supriya Pathak’s Dhankor vs Shabana Azmi’s Santok Jadeja the fight of the godmothers would make Brando blush.

Another very important element of the movie is the music and the songs. Every song with the exception of Ishqiyaon Dhishkiyaon is perfectly suited to the movie and given that the lyrics were written by Siddharth and Garima who share story credits as well every song helps in furthering the story. The background score by Monty and the actual music by Bhansali himself infuse Gujarati Folk songs into every note that the movie pulsates with a rhythmic frenzy that can only be witnessed during the final notes of a Garba dance. The costumes deserve a special mention because utmost care is taken to champion the traditional handloom techniques of the different regions of Gujarat, from the Kutchi-threadwork to block prints, Patola-weaving to many other exquisite techniques that only act to enhance Deepika’s beauty.

While this is not a perfect movie and the opening sequence and the second half needed more care from Bhansali and the character of Ram didn’t need those many pelvic thrusts, this is a movie that must not be missed. Watch it for Bhansali who makes a triumphant return to directing epic love stories like only he can. Watch it for Deepika Padukone. Watch it for the visual artistry that does not rely on exotic foreign locales; watch it for set pieces that are unparalleled in Bollywood today. Watch it for this is a beautiful adaptation of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet